Essay On History Of Olympics For Children

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

A Race With Grace: Sports Poetry in Motion

In this lesson, athletics, aesthetics, and poetics intersect in new ways as developing literacy learners experiment together with the forms of language.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Swish! Pow! Whack! Teaching Onomatopoeia Through Sports Poetry

Students explore poetry about sports, looking closely at the use of onomatopoeia. After viewing a segment of a sporting event, students create their own onomatopoeic sports poems.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Peace Poems and Picasso Doves: Literature, Art, Technology, and Poetry

Students apply think-aloud strategies to reading and to composition of artwork and poetry. They research symbols of peace as they prewrite, compose, and publish their poetry.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

The Peace Journey: Using Process Drama in the Classroom

What does peace mean to you? In this lesson, students attempt to answer this question as they write and perform a short skit that reflects their ideas of peace.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Exploring World Cultures Through Folk Tales

Journey around the world with students as they read a Japanese, African, or Welsh folk tale, create a visual depiction of the tale, research the tale's culture, and present findings.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Critical Media Literacy: TV Programs

By critically analyzing popular television programs, students develop an awareness of the messages that are portrayed through the media.

 

The first modern Olympics were held in Athens, Greece, in 1896. In the opening ceremony, King Georgios I and a crowd of 60,000 spectators welcomed 280 participants from 13 nations (all male), who would compete in 43 events, including track and field, gymnastics, swimming, wrestling, cycling, tennis, weightlifting, shooting and fencing. All subsequent Olympiads have been numbered even when no Games take place (as in 1916, during World War I, and in 1940 and 1944, during World War II). The official symbol of the modern Games is five interlocking colored rings, representing the continents of North and South America, Asia, Africa, Europe and Australia. The Olympic flag, featuring this symbol on a white background, flew for the first time at the Antwerp Games in 1920.

The Olympics truly took off as an international sporting event after 1924, when the VIII Games were held in Paris. Some 3,000 athletes (with more than 100 women among them) from 44 nations competed that year, and for the first time the Games featured a closing ceremony. The Winter Olympics debuted that year, including such events as figure skating, ice hockey, bobsledding and the biathlon. Eighty years later, when the 2004 Summer Olympics returned to Athens for the first time in more than a century, nearly 11,000 athletes from a record 201 countries competed. In a gesture that joined both ancient and modern Olympic traditions, the shotput competition that year was held at the site of the classical Games in Olympia.

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